This site was last updated : 06 June 2014.

 

COCKERMOUTH AND WORKINGTON JOINT WATER COMMITTEE.

 

On Thursday afternoon, the annual meeting of the above Committee was held at the Local Board Offices, Washington Street.  There were present:  MESSRS. T. PAISLEY (chairman);  P. WEDGEWOOD,  D.

...

We regret to announce the death, yesterday morning, of Mr.  WILSON, of
Shotley Hall, at the age of 80 years.

Mr. WILSON was highly respected in both East Cumberland and in  
Northumberland, and his public spirit, especially in encouraging the finer  

...


Markets

Mark LANE Corn Exchange, July 26th, - We had heavy rain yesterday, and the
weather this morning has rather an unsettled appearance. Harvest work has been
partially commenced, and the reports from the country respecting the appear of
the

...
On Wednesday evening a sale of property by auction took place in  the Saving
Bank’s large room. Mr. William BROWN was the auctioneer.

 The property consisted of two shops in Wilson Street, Workington, and  a
shop and dwelling house in the same street, a...

DEATHS.

MUSGRAVE - At Duke Street, Penrith, on the 24th ult., MARY MUSGRAVE, aged 28
years.

FALLOWFIELD - At 17, Middlegate, Penrith, on the 24th ult., the infant
daughter of Mr. JONATHAN FALLOWFIELD.

SPEDDING - In Burrowgate, Penrith, on the 24th ult.,

...
Sir William WORSLEY is a gentleman whose views upon the  political questions
of the day have at least the merit of  originality.

 Addressing a meeting of Conservatives at York on Monday  night, he seems to
have distinguished himself greatly by the displ...
WHITEHAVEN AND  DISTRICT

THURSDAY.
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At this market there was only a small supply of wheat, and the  prices were
16s to 17s. Barley sold at 11s 6d. A fair supply of oats, which sold  at 8s 3d.
Indian corn keeps dear, and little doing in store wheat.

***...
Cumberland Ship Building

       Mr. LAMPORT, the eminent ship-builder of Workington, is now about
engaging to build two splendid vessels at his yard in that town, one of 1,200
tons, and the other 1,000 tons burden. Messers PEILE, SCOTT & Co., of t...
An inquest was held by the County Coroner at Failsworth, on Tuesday  into the
cause of the death of a handloom weaver, named Simeon POLLITT, aged 71  years.

In the month of January the deceased was called to see a dog which was ill,  
and he administ...

       A few weeks ago a lady of genteel appearance. rather below the middle
size and pretty looking, called at the shop of Mr. MOORE, in the Market-Place,
and requested him to put up three pairs of shoes to fit two children of the
respective age...
 
THE WORKINGTON
MURDER
___
 
EXAMINATION OF HARRISON
YESTERDAY.
Part One.
 
 
    On Saturday morning at eleven o'clock Maynard James HARRISON, aged 17 years who is charged with the wilful murder of Lucy SANDS, at the North-side, Workington, on or about the 1st December last, was brought up on remand for examination at Workington.
 
    The magistrates on the Bench were William THOMPSON, Esq. (Chairman) and Michael FALCON, Esq. Before the time announced for the court to open a large crowd had assembled in front of the Court House, not one-fifth of whom were able to gain admission when the doors were thrown open. Mr. PAISLEY appeared for the prisoner, and Superintendent BIRD conducted the prosecution.
 
    Henry MAINPRIZE stated that he wished to make some explanation with respect to the change of his name. BEDFORD, he said, was his father's name. After his father's death he went to live with his grandfather, who was named BEDFORD, when he was two years and six months old. He returned to his home when he was 14 years of age, and by that time his mother had got married a second time to a man named MAINPRIZE and the name of MAINPRIZE was given to him (witness) by the inhabitants of the village. He had a sister who was also know by the name MAINPRIZE.
 
    When he returned from Manchester he was known by the name BEDFORD, but he received letters addressed to him as "Henry MAINPRIZE." When he went back to Yeadon, the place at which he had previously resided, he was called by the name MAINPRIZE again, and had been known by it ever since. When leaving the Court last Saturday he met the prisoner at the door, who muttered some thing like these words, "You --- I will have your life. When I come out of this you will not live another day."
 
    In answer to Superintendent BIRD witness said he was quite positive that the prisoner made use of this threat, and it was after he had been giving evidence in connection with that inquiry.
 
    By Mr. PAISLEY: Came to Workington in May 1880. He had been in the employ of Moss Bay Iron and Steel Company as assistant chemist. When he lived in Manchester he resided at Miles Platting. Was married last November at St. John's Church, Workington. Was married under the name BEDFORD. Would be 23 years of age in June.
 
    James REAY deposed that he was a labourer and resided at 42, King-street, Workington. Him and Lucy SANDS were second cousins. On the 1st December last he was twice at the house where Lucy SANDS lived. The first time he was there was a little after four o'clock in the afternoon,  and again about seven in the evening. The first time he was in he saw Lucy curling her hair.
 
    He said, "You are taking a deal of pain with yourself; what is the matter?"
 
    She said, "I am going to see my young man."
 
    He replied, "Have you a young man?"
 
    "Oh yes I have," she replied.
 
    He asked her who he was and she replied "They call him Mr. HARRISON?" She said this twice over. She said no more, and he left her in the house. Never saw her after that till he saw her body at Workington Bridge Station.
 
    By Mr. PAISLEY: On the day he called at the house Lucy told him her grandmother was working at the church. Was working himself in the forenoon at the quarries. There was no person in the house but Lucy herself. Remained in the house for about twenty minutes. The second time he called Lucy was not in. Did not give evidence before the coroner. Knew that an inquest was being held on the body of his relative, Lucy SANDS. Did not mention what he had told to-day to Lucy's grandmother and aunt. The first person he mentioned the matter to was Mr. RENNICKS, when in Bridge Street. Mentioned it to the police the same day. That would be before last Saturday. Knew the inquiry was going on, but did not take the trouble to mention it to the police. Did not know the prisoner.
 
    Jessie NICHOLAS deposed that she was a dressmaker, and resided in High Street. Remembered the 1st of March, when she met HARRISON at the top of Wilson Street. She was in company of Harry MAINPRIZE. That was the day on which the body of Lucy Sands was found. Met HARRISON between Mrs. WAITE's and the shop of Mr. SMITH, the grocer. He asked her if she had been to see the body, and said, "I have been to see the bloody thing!" She replied, "Whoever did it ought to be punished."
 
 
~To be continued