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ST. JOSEPH'S MISSION, COCKERMOUTH.
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CHURCH AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS.
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GRAND BAZAAR.


During the short time the Rev Father FISHWICK has laboured in Cockermouth he has adopted as his motto progress for the little mission church of St. Joseph, of which he has charge, and the betterment of the small community of those who worship there. Having by renovations and improvements caused the somewhat dull and comfortless appearance of the surroundings of his church to give place to a brighter and more cheerful aspect he turned his attention to the schools adjoining, which had for long been closed. These it was decided to re-open, but before this could be done considerable improvements needed to be carried out to meet up-to-date requirements and satisfy the education authorities. This work has been carried out in a manner which is calculated to provide for the comfort and convenience of those using the place as well as the necessary facilities for a good all-round elementary education. The question as to raising funds for carrying out these changes was met !
by a decision to hold a bazaar, and the great amount of work necessary to make this effort a success was entered into with a zest and willingness which did credit to the promoters and all concerned. The result of much giving and many months of patient and unselfish labour on the part of helpers of all classes and sects was seen in a bazaar which was inaugurated at the Public Hall, Cockermouth, yesterday ( Tuesday ). Here were assembled in tasteful array the handiwork and gifts of those both inside and outside the Catholic community who have the interests of the mission at heart, and very gratifying indeed was the response on all hands to the appeal made for help. Though no elaborate scheme of decoration or arrangement had been aimed at, the interior of the hall had been very prettily transformed, the decoration being neat and tasteful. Heavily laden stalls were arranged along the four sides of the building, and the profusion of articles for use, ornament, or pleasureable amusement were of such a varied nature that rich and poor alike were able to make purchases to suit their tastes and pockets. By the manner in which the wares were displayed it was evident that the stallholders were well up in their business, and there was ample proof of their ability to make the most of their opportunities by the rapid way in which the purses of their patrons lightened and their more bulky possessions increased as the sale proceeded. Those who succeeded in bringing about this happy state of things were :-

St. Joseph's Stall.-
Mrs HUNTER, Miss FLEMING, Miss ST.CLAIR, Miss Agnes DOBSON,
Miss CHAMBERY, Miss TIPPING Miss Margaret HIGGINS.

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Children of Mary's Stall :-
Miss Mary HIGGINS, Miss Elizabeth HIGGINS, Miss MORRISON,
Miss McG#IE, Miss Ada HIGGINS, and Miss M. A. SLOANE.

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Childrens Stall :- Mrs DOBSON, Miss Nellie DOBSON, Miss ROONEY.

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Photo Stall :- Miss Ellen FAGAN, Miss Annie FAGAN.

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Flower Stall :- Miss Winefride JOHNSTON.

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Crockery Stall :- Messrs KEENAN Bros.

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THE OPENING CEREMONY.

MR. SENHOUSE SPEAKS FOR THE VOLUNTARY SCHOOLS.

At the opening ceremony yesterday the Very Rev Canon WATERTON presided, and was supported on the platform by the Rev Fathers FISHWICK, Cockermouth ; STANDISH, DUGGAN, and DAWES, Workington ; FEENY, NEBLETT, Maryport ; BOURKE, Wigton ; BARNETT, Warwick Bridge ; and Messrs H. P. SENHOUSE, The Fitz ; and BAYLIFF, Workington. There was a good attendance of the public, amongst those present being Mrs HAYTON, Miss WAUGH, Miss WADDELL, Mrs J. R. MITCHELL, Misses RITSON, Miss HALL, Miss PEILE, Miss SEWELL, Miss DICKINSON (The Towers), Mr and Mrs BRASH, MR and Mrs BOLTON, Mrs CLARK, Messrs T. ARMSTRONG Theodore FISHER, P. ROBINSON, HAWES, &c.
Canon WATERTON said he believed the Chairman was generally described as a gentleman who could fill the chair with satisfaction to himself and if possible to the satisfaction of the audience. Of course he could vouch for the correctness of the first description- that he could fill the chair pretty comfortably-(laughter)-but whether he would do so with satisfaction to them he could not say. He believed another qualification for a chairman was to be very brief, and he was sure he would have that qualification. His pleasant duty was to introduce to them Mr SENHOUSE, who had kindly volunteered to open the bazaar, (Applause,) Mr SENHOUSE belonged to a family well known in this county ; one whose ancestor's names had been writ in the annals of the county and always tamed for liberality of spirit and the great interest they had always taken in every good work in the county. (Hear, hear,) He was sure it would be perfectly superfluous to say anything more except to introduce one who was so well known to them. (Applause).
Mr SENHOUSE thanked the Chairman for the kind things he had said regarging his past history as well as in regard to himself. When Father FISHWICK asked him to open this bazaar he thought exactly what he thought now- that they certainly might have got a person who would have done it more gracefully. ("No no") At any rate, they could not have got any person who had a greater appreciation of the value of voluntary schools. He knew that voluntary schools came in for a great deal of harsh criticism, and a good deal more sometimes- what he thought was very unfair criticism. Still, he supposed that as nothing in the world was good for anything that did not receive a good many hard knocks, no doubt the voluntary schools had had a good deal of severe criticism, but he thought nevertheless that they had done a great deal of very good work. (Applause.) One of the points on which the
VOLUNTARY SCHOOLS WERE BITTERLY ATTACKED was the fact that the subscriptions given by their supporters were so small. That was undoubtedly true, and no doubt the critics were right ; But there was one point which they always either ignored or took care not to mention, and that was the very great expense incurred in the maintenance of the fabric. Voluntary schools in the last 20 or 25 years, to his knowledge, had been almost re-built ; at any rate had been so altered that very few of them who had seen them 25 years ago would know them now. The expense that had been entailed in re-arrangements and alterations and extensions was something enormous. He did not intend to go in for statistics, as these were dry and also liable to the accusation of being false. People who had estimated - and he thought it was greatly under-estimated - the cost of the maintenance of voluntary schools stated that it was at least two millions, and that the capital value of voluntary schools in
England was at least fifty millions. He would not say for one moment that this money came entirely out of the pockets of the people who had the management and control of these schools, but one thing he was certain about, and that was that it was
ALL GIVEN VOLUNTARILY ;
not a single penny came out of the rates, and no one gave to these schools except they wished to do so. (Hear, hear,)

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CHURCH AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS.
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GRAND BAZAAR.
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Mr SENHOUSE Continued.

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....................ALL GIVEN VOLUNTARILY
not a single penny came out of the rates, and no one gave to these schools except they wished to do so. (Hear, hear,) Therefore the general body of ratepayers had been relieved of paying a very large amount of money, and they could congratulate themselves upon this relief, and upon the fact that there were other people willing and able to take upon themselves the burdens of education. (Applause,) With regard to St. Joseph's Schools, they had done a good work, and he thought they would all be gratified that the schools had been so well renovated and made entirely up to modern requirement to carry on the education which they all hoped would carry on. These schools would shortly be ready to accommodate something like 80 children, which would relieve to a great extent other schools in the town, which he believed were quite full enough if not too full. Therefore he thought he could appeal to them upon what he might call the lowest grounds - the grounds of
SAVING THEIR POCKETS
by avoiding the extension of other scools - to subscribe liberally and handsomely towards this object, so that the schools might go ahead when started and continue to carry on the work of education which they used to do in the past. (Applause,) There was one more point, which was perhaps somewhat incidental and secondary to the main argument, and that was the improvements carried out at these schools had given a much better appearance to the main street of the town. (Hear, hear and Applause.) Those who looked forward to beautifying the town of Cockermouth to the best of their ability would certainly view with a great deal of pleasure the opening out in front of the house of Father FISHWICK. (Applause,)
Father FISHWICK said he did not know when he had been placed in a more difficult position than he was to-day, because he had to return thanks to Mr SENHOUSE for his great kindness in coming here, and to his very dear friend Canon WATERTON for taking the chair. (Applause,) He did not know where to start to thank people for the sympathy shown to the Catholic community in Cockermouth in connection with the mission and schools. Anybody who knew the small number of people in his flock - 561 all told in a district extending as far as Threlkeld and the surrounding districts - and those who knew that these were not blessed with much of the riches of the world might say that the Catholics must be mad to attempt such alterations as had been attempted at the school and the public alterations in the main street, which, he thought, were agreed by all to be
A GREAT PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT.
Part 4 Father FISHWICK's thanks continued.

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A GREAT PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT.
He did not know where to start when he thought of the great kindness not only of their own people - and he was proud to be in the position to lead a flock which showed such courage and willingness - but not only their own Catholics but the Catholics of Workington had aided them very much, and the little children whom he had charge of for six years at Workington had sent many presents. There were also many of other denominations who had helped them. (Applause,) He was told when he was appointed to Cockermouth that other denominations had always shown a kindly feeling towards the Catholics, and at the first concert they had here had experience of that, and he had had further experience in the help and kindness shown in connection with this bazaar. He thanked all who had helped and Mr SENHOUSE and Canon WATERTON especially, who had proved their kindness by their presence there to-day. (Applause,)
Mr SENHOUSE then declared the bazaar open, and business was soon proceeding briskly.
Excellent music was contributed by Mr BOWE'S Orchestra ; songs were sung by Miss ARDEN, Harrington, and Mr E. GARD, Workington ; and pedestal dances given by the Bros DORAN.
The bazarr will be continued to-day (Wedensday) and to-morrow.
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