The fortnightly meeting of this Board was held yesterday (Tuesday), when there were present: -

John BARNES, of Woodlands (in the chair)

W. WILLIAMSON (vice-chairman)

W. SHARP

W. HOLLIDAY

Jas. KERR

J. MARK

C. TOPPING

T. RICHARDSON

E. BEWLEY

G. GIBSON

G. MORTON

J. M. TIMPERON

Jos. RAWLINGS

A. B. CLARK

J. STUDHOLME

D. B. HOLLIDAY

J. J. COULTHARD

W. S. BARNES

J. FELL

W. WOOD

Rev. Father BOURKE

Rev. Father EWBANK


HOMES FOR THE WORKHOUSE
CHILDREN.

       Mr. J. BECKTON (relieving officer) reported favourably of the home offered by Robert DRUGGAN, of Fletchertown for a Workhouse ???, and the Board
decided to grant Mr. DRUGGAN'S application.

       Mr. TATE applied, on behalf of a woman in Bolton parish, for leave to adopt a workhouse boy. Rev. J. EWBANK thought it was rather strange that he and his brother representative for Bolton had not been approached on the matter. The chairman thought it should have been mentioned to the representatives of the parish.

Father BOURKE said it would have only been a courtesy. Mr. TATE said he intend no disrespect to the Bolton representatives. It was probably mentioned to him because he had advocated boarding out. A members attitude to these matters was noticed. The Relieving Officer was instructed to inspect the home offered. Mr. TATE said he would be glad if Father BOURKE would do his best to get the Catholic child, BRANNIGAN, into some home, as it appeared they had no power to send her into a Protestant family. Father BOURKE said that he hoped Mr. TATE would give him credit for being anxious for the child's welfare, but it was really difficult to secure respectable homes. Mr. TATE said surely Father BOURKE didn't mean them to infer there were no respectable people among the Catholics. (Laughter.) Father BOURKE said there were two ends to the stick. They had to find people willing to take the children, and then had to be assured the conditions would be favourable for the child's welfare.

The Chairman: Father BOURKE is cautious and I think he is right of it.

RESTITUTION.

Mr. MOORE, Relieving Officer, said the person who brought or took in the clothes of the child SHARP had given them up. He had taken them to the workhouse and they would be sent back with the child to Shap.

A BIG ACCOUNT.

Mr. WILLIAMSON drew attention to an account from Mr. McKNIGHT, painter and glazier, of £28, for oils, paints, tins, and glass, and suggested that the Board would have a contract for such big amounts.

The Workhouse Master said a portion of the account was for baking tins.

The Chairman said they had been taking the matter over to the workhouse master, and he suggested that they should have a contract.

The Board agreed to the motion by Mr. RAWLINGS that in the future painting and glazing be let by tender.

THE MILK CONTRACT.

Mr. GIBSON suggested the advisability of making the milk contract a three years contract instead of a yearly one, as the contractor frequently went to considerable expense in buying cattle to enable him to carry out his contract, only to find, perhaps next year his tender rejected and his outlay needless.

The Clerk said he was afraid the law wouldn't sanction a triennial contract, but he would look it up. Mr. GIBSON suggested that during the hot weather, when milk was bad to keep, the workhouse should be supplied with skimmed or separated milk. The Workhouse Master said he was afraid the inspector would object.  Mr. GIBSON said they had to object to something, but he thought they said too much. If the milk was poorer it was at any rate sweeter. There certainly wouldn't be much butter in it. The contractor had already found it difficult to keep the milk good. The Workhouse Master said he had twice lately been obliged to give the inmates a meat dinner in place of their usual milk dinner.

It was decided to consider the matter further when the tenders were
submitted.


AN INDEPENDENT WOMAN.

       Mr. TATE expressed himself strongly with regard to the conduct of a woman who was applying for relief. She was living apart from her husband, refusing the home he offered her. If it hadn't been her own bad tongue and bad temper she would have been with her husband yet. Instead of going back to live with him she sent him a nasty insulting letter. She told him with what she could get of the union and her neighbours she could do better without him than with him. If she wouldn't go back with him she deserved to starve.

The Clerk: The law won't allow her to starve. It was decided to offer the woman the house.


VACCINATION AND CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS.

The order from Whitehall with respect to the operation of the new Vaccination Law was read.

Mr. EWBANK asked the Chairman if he and his brother Magistrates had yet made up their minds what a conscientious objector was.

Mr. WILLIAMS said he was afraid they would be a long time in doing that.

Mr. GIBSON said a knowledge of the circumstances of each case would be
necessary.

Mr. MARK said he saw a case had been tried in London, and the Magistrate declined to decide the point but referred the parties to the Local Government Board.

The Chairman: I suppose if a person came and made a declaration that in his opinion it would be an injury to his child to have it vaccinated it would be sufficient.

Rev. EWBANK: I should think so.

Mr. WILLIAMSON: It is not specified what theyhave to do to convince you that
they have a  conscientious objection.

Mr. EWBANK: It leaves it to the Magistrates.


PAUPERISM AND VAGRANCY.

The paupers last week were reported as 97 - a decrease on 10 on the corresponding week last year. The vagrants numbered 141, as against the 119 the previous fortnight and 123 the corresponding fortnight of last year.