‘TIS FIFTY YEARS SINCE.
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INTERESTING LOCAL
EVENTS - No. 295.
PART I.
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Under this heading we commenced on January 7th, 1897, publishing extracts from the “Cumberland Pacquet” of fifty years ago. We continue from
 
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1852.
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 S. IRTON, Esq., M. P., will leave Irton Hall in the course of tomorrow for London, to attend his parliamentary duties.
 

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Dr. DICKINSON, M. A., M. D., of Liverpool, brother of John DICKINSON, Esq., of Havercroft, near this town, has been appointed president of the Literary and Philosophical Society, Liverpool, in the place of Joseph Brooks YATES, whose period of office has expired.
 

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At a special meeting of the Trustees of the Whitehaven Turnpike Roads, at the Public Office, in this town, on Saturday last, it was resolved to erect a checkgate at Banhouse Lane End, on the Egremont road, and also to involve an extension of gaspiping from the Retreat to the gate, but, as the Trustees have ample funds, so trifling an outlay will not be suffered to stand in the way of the contemplated improvement.
 

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A boy of five years of age, named William MARTIN, whose parents reside at Scillybanks, near this town, was choked by a button last week.
 

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ST. BEES FIREWORKS.
 

 We understand that the inhabitants of St. Bees purpose to exhibit their loyalty in the good old style, by a display of fireworks on the 5th of November. The preparations of this year, we believe, have been made on a grander scale than heretofore. Arrangements have been entered into with the Whitehaven and Furness Railway Company, for the dispatch of a train from Whitehaven at 8 o’clock p.m., which will return after the completion  of the evenings amusement.
 
 The services of the Whitehaven Band have been engaged to enliven the proceedings. In addition to the fireworks, several balloons, throwing out shells, etc., will be set up, and the occasion altogether is expected to present the finest pyrotechinc exhibition ever witnessed in this neighbourhood.
 
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 Three lectures were delivered before the Workington Mechanics Institution, by Mr. John CAMERON, of Lee, Kent, on the evening of Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday last, on the “Scientific, poetical and philosophical explanation of natural objects.”
 
 The audience was numerous on each occasion. On Wednesday evening, the chairman, Mr. C. LAMPORT, shipbuilder, observed that the tendency of the lecturer, and the general tendency of all men in whom the poetical element predominated, was to exalt the poetical at the expense of the scientific. He gave as an example the case of the descriptions of the building of a ship, in a poem by LONGFELLOW, and said that if his ships were built on the principles laid down by the poet they would certainly not class A1 at Lloyd’s.
 
 

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 A few months ago some benevolent ladies in Cockermouth undertook to raise subscriptions for the purpose of supplying a number of the poorer families in that town with blankets for the winter. The project was liberally supported, and 114 blankets were distributed to suitable applicants in the new market house last Friday. The blankets were of a superior subscription to those generally bestowed under similar circumstances, having been manufactured for the occasion by Mr. J. GRAVE.
 

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 Mr. Robert RAVEN, pencil maker, Keswick slaughtered a very fine pig of the short eared breed a few days ago, which weighed 21 ½ stone. It was bred by Mr. J. CROSTHWAITE, of Monkshall, near Keswick, and was precisely nine months old on the day it was slaughtered.
 
 
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 A pear of extraordinary size was brought to the “Pacquet Office” for inspection yesterday. It measured 12 ½ inches in circumference lengthwise, and 11 inches round the thickest part, and weighed 14 ounces. It was grown in the garden, Chapel House, formerly occupied by the late R. WHITESIDE, Wsq.
 

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 A husbandry servant, John MARSTON, in the employment of Mr. Joseph THOMPSON, of Whithystead, in the parish of Askham, was thrown from a cart on Tuesday last by the rearing of the horse. The wheel passed over his body, and inflicted such injuries on him that he died on the following day.
 

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 Ulverston fair,  yesterday week, was but thinly attended, both by sellers and purchasers. The stock exhibited was small in quantity and not of very superior quality; a slight advance, however, took place in prices.
 
 

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 A miner, named Samuel SMITH, lost his life by the fall of the basket in which he and two other  men were descending a pit at the ironworks of Messrs SCHNEIDER and Co., near Dalton, on Saturday week.
 
 The men were going to work an hour earlier than usual, in order to get off work an hour before the accustomed time in the evening, to join in the amusements of Dalton Fair. Not finding the engineman in attendance at that early hour, they proceeded to lower themselves by the aid of an iron winch,; but, the rope being wet, and not having been sufficiently secured round the barrel, the weight of the three men who first entered the basket caused it to slip, and and the basket and men were precipitated to the bottom, a depth of upwards of a hundred feet.
 
 SMITH survived some hours, of the other two one had his hip dislocated, but the injuries sustained by the third are not considered serious. An inquest has been held on SMITH, and a verdict of “accidental death” returned.
 

Under this heading we commenced on January 7th, 1897, publishing extracts from the “Cumberland Pacquet” of fifty years ago. We continue from:
 
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1852.
 
DEATHS.
 
 
 

In Preston Street, on the 28th Oct. 1853, Mr. James M’BRIDE, son fo Alexander M’BRIDE, late tide surveyor at this port, aged 21 years.
 

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Since our last, in Tangier Street, William , son of Mr. John GRAHAM, aged 18 years. Oct. 1853
 

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At Silly Banks, near this town, Oct. 1853, William MARTIN, in the 5th year of his age.
 

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At Hensingham, on the 30th Oct. 1853, after a lingering illness, Mr. Jacob HILTON, of the firm of I and J. HILTON, tobacco manufacturers, Whitehaven, aged 24 years, much respected by all who knew him.
 

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Since our last in Carter Lane, in this town, Mrs. Dorothy NEWAL, widow, in an advanced age. Oct. 1953.
 

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At Hensingham, near this town, yesterday evening, in consequence of the bursting of a blood vessel, during a fit of coughing, Mr. YOUART, mason, in the prime of life.  Nov. 1, 1853.
 

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On Wednesday, at Distington, after a short indisposition, Mrs. Margaret FREAR, landlady of the Globe Inn, at that place, aged 63, much respected. Nov. 1983.
 

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On Sunday week, Oct. 1853, in Blundle Street, Liverpool, Mrs. FLETCHER, innkeeper, daughter of Mr. John HIRD, of Pallaflat, near Egremont; much respected.
 

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At Workington, since our last, (Oct. 853), Mrs. WILLIAMS, aged 58.